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Nawaz Sharif elected PML-N president after 6 years

Nawaz Sharif

LAHORE, MAY 28: Nawaz Sharif has been elected “unopposed” as president of the Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz (PML-N), once again after more than six years today.

No other PML-N leader submitted their nomination papers against the party supremo for the top post. Nawaz’s papers were approved for the party election.

The development came after his party nominated him as the party’s head.

Speaking to Geo News senior political analyst Mazhar Abbas said that Nawaz retaking the PML-N’s helm was expected.

However, he noted that the party decided to give back the presidency to Nawaz after the February 8 elections as previously he was aiming to be a candidate for the prime ministership if the party had secured a simple majority in the National Assembly.

Stressing that the PML-N faces a wide array of challenges in Punjab, Abbas underscored that it is to be seen what direction Nawaz will set as the party’s president.

According to The News, sources from the party had earlier said that Nawaz would be elected through an election for the party president which has been rescheduled from the second week of May to May 28, the day celebrated as Youm-e-Takbir. On this day in 1998, Pakistan had responded to India’s nuclear tests while Nawaz was prime minister.

Through a notification on Monday, Prime Minister Shehbaz Sharif has declared May 28, 2024, a public holiday.

On July 28, 2017, Nawaz lost both the prime minister’s office and the presidency of his party as a result of the Panama Papers ruling. Ever since, the PML-N has constructed a narrative centred around the catchphrase “Mujhy Kyun Nikala” (Why was I removed?).

At a news conference on Monday, PML-N Chief Election Commissioner Rana Sanaullah stated that the party leaders had the consensus that Nawaz should lead the party. He said that Shehbaz had resigned from his position as party president, but he was still permitted by the Central Working Committee to carry out his responsibilities until the election of a new leader.

As per the party constitution, the election commission was appointed by the Central Working Committee and the commission issued the election timetable, said Sanaullah.

Today’s timing for accepting nomination papers were from 10am to 12pm; they had to be examined at 1pm, and the final list had to be readied by 3pm. Any party member was allowed to submit nomination papers.

Sanaullah said each party had its own election procedures such as nomination papers were not submitted in Jamaat-e-Islami, where the Shura elected the ameer. He underlined that he was not against Jamaat-e-Islami’s approach.

He highlighted Pakistan’s success in becoming a nuclear power under Nawaz’s leadership, as well as his role in turning the PML-N into a party for the average man. Nawaz had always been involved in major party decisions and would remain so, he underlined.

He said that other party positions should be filled by different members and that Shehbaz remained a significant leader, especially noted for his efforts in restoring the economy. He mentioned that Shahid Khaqan Abbasi could also submit his candidature documents, which would be scrutinised for eligibility.

Sanaullah asserted that the PML-N was a party of dialogue and emphasised the importance of cooperation between the government and the opposition. He also expressed his hope that PTI’s founder avoided a fate similar to that of Mujeebur Rahman and stressed the need for dialogue.

He reassured that Nawaz Sharif was not angry with anyone and remained fully active. Fundamental decisions in the federal and Punjab governments involved Nawaz’s consultation and approval. Nawaz’s statements were expected to become more frequent over the time.

If no other candidate submits nomination papers, Nawaz will be elected unopposed; otherwise, the election will be decided by a show of hands. Party sources mentioned that besides the election of the party president, the PML-N meeting will also discuss various resolutions to be presented to the general council.






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